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Dangerous Intersections

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The most dangerous intersections on State Farm's published list hasn't changed since 1999 like all the intersections.

State Farm compiles these lists through car accident claims submitted by its policy holders.  

State Farm provides expensive research into dangerous intersections and considers

  • the number of crashes at various intersections, 
  • how many of those crashes involved injury and 
  • the severity of those crashes. 

Statistics are adjusted by the number of specific State Farm policyholders in the area.

City/State Location
1. Pembroke Pines, Fla.

Flamingo Road and Pines Boulevard

2. Philadelphia, Penn.

Red Lion Road and Roosevelt Boulevard

3. Philadelphia, Penn. Grant Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard

4. Phoenix, Ariz.

7th Street and Bell Road

5. Tulsa, Okla. 51st Street and Memorial Drive
6. Tulsa, Okla. 71st Street and Memorial Drive
7. Phoenix, Ariz. 19th Avenue and Northern Avenue
8. Plano, Tex. State Highway 121 and Preston Road
9. Metairie, La. Clearview Parkway and Veterans Memorial Boulevard
10. Sacramento, Calif. Fair Oaks Boulevard and Howe Avenue

list released June 27, 2001 State Farm Insurance


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Dangerous Intersections in US
One third of all accidents happen at intersections.  State Farm published the top 10 most dangerous U.S. intersections

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